Multimedia

Human Right № 1 - We Are All Born Free & Equal

Do you know what Human Rights are? Every person is entitled to certain fundamental rights - simply by the fact of being human. These are called “human rights” rather than a privilege (which can be taken away at someone’s whim). They are "rights" because they are things you are allowed to be, to do or to have. These rights are there for your protection against people who might want to harm or hurt you. They are also there to help us get along with each other and live in peace.

More video

At Rock Bottom

At Rock Bottom

"Our neighbourhood is absolutely identical to all other Roma neighbourhoods in Bulgaria. It's got nice houses, families that live on a higher standard, and there's what we call "the ghetto" where the living conditions are at rock bottom.", says Kosyo Kosev, mayor of Nikolaevo municipality. "If we build a shell around ourselves and say "These are Roma, or Gypsies, or whatever", they will become capsulated as an ethnos and that won't lead to anything good for this country."

A Bulgarian Helsinki Committee production
Music - Vlasko (Rosza) - CC BY-NC-SA 3.0

Humans of the Year

Humans of the Year

The refugees and "Friends of the Refugees" were awarded with the distinction “Human of the year” 2013 in the annual Bulgarian Helsinki Committee awards for the contribution to and protection of human rights. “Give” them their award by signing the petition here: http://www.bghelsinki.org/en/dejstvaj/ne-narushavaite-pravata-na-bezhancite/

On November 14, 2013 the Bulgarian Council of Ministers adopted the draft amendments to the Law on Asylum and Refugees (LAR). The amendments introduce the detention of asylum seekers in closed-type facilities, bail measures and denial of prompt access to their registration card.

The proposed amendments violate the rights of the most vulnerable group – children seeking asylum. Between January and December 2013 the children seeking asylum in Bulgaria are 2135. Some are unaccompanied by relatives or family. 

Why is the detention of children in closed-type centers dangerous?

The deprivation of liberty damages a child’s normal development. It is unconditionally prohibited by the Bulgarian Child Protection Act.

Bail is a measure of deterrence and is only applied against persons accused of having committed a crime. Detention in closed-type centers is a compulsory administrative measure for irregular migrants, who are to be deported from the country. Thus, under the proposed LAR amendments, children seeking asylum will be treated as criminals and irregular migrants to be deported. A child seeking asylum cannot be deemed irregular migrant before a procedure of granting or refusing of international asylum has taken place.

The children seeking asylum in Bulgaria are not criminals. They are not irregular migrants either. The children seeking asylum are vulnerable. Let us protect them, not prosecute them.

Watch the video to learn how you can help the children seeking asylum.

A Bulgarian Helsinki Committee production. 

CHILD MARRIAGE

CHILD MARRIAGE

The government of Malawi should increase efforts to end widespread child and forced marriage, or risk worsening poverty, illiteracy, and preventable maternal deaths in the country.

According to government statistics, half of the girls in Malawi will be married by their 18th birthday, with some as young as age 9 or 10 being forced to marry.

Malawi faces many economic challenges, but the rights of the country's girls and women should not be sacrificed as a result.

Human Rights Watch

Opening the Courtroom Doors for People with Disabilities

Opening the Courtroom Doors for People with Disabilities

Across Europe, thousands of people with intellectual disabilities are placed in institutions, where they are mistreated without repercussions.  N-Map produced this video to support the case of Valentin Cåmpeanu, a young man who died in such a facility in Romania.  Mr. Cåmpeanu was a Roma man with HIV and a severe intellectual disability.  He was also an orphan.  When he turned 18 he was transferred from a youth facility to an adult facility.  The new facility was not informed of his HIV, so he never received his medication.  He died alone in a cold room. Because Cåmpeanu has no next of kin, there is no one to sue on is behalf. 

Several European human rights NGOs, including INTERIGHTS, Center for Legal Resources and Bulgarian Helsinki Committee are arguing before the European Court of Human Rights that they should have the right to sue on Mr. Cåmpeanu – or there will be no one to hold the Romanian government accountable for his death.  N-Map produced this video to support the case, and to humanize what is essentially a technical procedural issue. 

The ruling of the Grand Chamber on Campeanu vs. Romania, especially on the issue of admissibility, ie the right of human rights NGOs such as the Bulgarian Helsinki Committee to file applications with the ECHR in similar cases will set an extremely important precedent for European law. If Campeanu were to succeed, so would three Bulgarian cases of inhuman treatment and deprivation of life of defenseless institutionalised children – cases to which society turns a blind eye. The court will open the doors of the Convention rights for those crushed by society – for those insulated from everyone and everything , so that no one can protect them. The dead Kampeanu can change that.

See more here: http://www.interights.org/campeanu/index.html

Evict Them in Five Easy Steps

Evict Them in Five Easy Steps

In every part of the world people are forced out of their homes without warning or consultation, without access to justice and without compensation. These forced evictions often involve violence. They destroy livelihoods and social networks, and drive people deeper into poverty often resulting in many becoming homeless and destitute. This is why Amnesty International and WITNESS, along with the design firm Pentagram, got together to produce this short animation showing how governments and corporations forcibly evict people.

A Syrian child's wish as the number of refugees tops the million mark

A Syrian child's wish as the number of refugees tops the million mark

The number of children who have fled the conflict in Syria has now topped the one million mark.

That according to the United Nations is half the total of those fleeing Syria while about three-quarters of those children are under the age of 11. The country is in danger of losing a generation believes Antonio Guterres the UN HIgh Commissioner for Refugees.

One nine-year-old refugee voiced the desperate hopes of many when he said: "I want to return to Syria to live in peace and to go back to school. I want to be able to play with my old friends again, just like before. I want our country to be safe, safe enough to live in and for it to be prosperous again." 

Euronews

Escape to Freedom

Escape to Freedom

There are more than 15 million refugees all around the world. They flee  from war, violence and oppression. Pregnant women, children and sick people are many among them.  

Annually Bulgaria is addressed with less than 1000 refugee applications. Notwithstanding, conditions for registration, admission and accommodation of asylum seekers in Bulgaria are completely inadequate. Instead of being accommodated in reception centers, refugees are confined in detention centers for illegal immigrants with Ministry of Interior.  

Bulgarian law does not provide any deadline when they have to be released.

A Bulgarian Helsinki Committee production

Italy Sends Kids Back to Bad Conditions in Greece

Italy Sends Kids Back to Bad Conditions in Greece

taly is summarily returning unaccompanied migrant children and adult asylum seekers to Greece, where they face a dysfunctional asylum system and abusive detention conditions, Human Rights Watch said in a report published on Jan 21, 2013. Stowaways on ferries from Greece, including children as young as 13, are sent back by Italian authorities within hours without adequate consideration of their particular needs as children or their desire to apply for asylum.

War Crimes in Mali

War Crimes in Mali

United Nations human rights chief has condemned the ongoing human rights violations in northern Mali, including cruel punishments such as amputations, and called on the Government and the international community to urgently address the crisis.

"According to credible reports that my office has received, the various armed groups currently occupying northern Mali have been committing serious human rights violations and possibly war crimes," High Commissioner for Human Rights Navi Pillay told the UN Human Rights Council.
Mali's Justice minister Malick Coulibaly addressing the Council appealed to the International Community to support Mali in its efforts to promote peace in the country.

Working to Make Child Labour a Thing of the Past

Working to Make Child Labour a Thing of the Past

Tuesday 12th June marks World Day Against Child Labour. Despite efforts by the International Labour Organisation to ban the worst practices, it is still a common sight in many countries - even those where there are laws against it. In India, education has been made compulsory to age 14 in a bid to crack down on child labour, but crippling poverty means many families have no choice but to send their offspring out to do what is often difficult and dangerous work. (France 24International News)

Syrian First Lady Silent on Syria's Human Rights Record

Syrian First Lady Silent on Syria's Human Rights Record

Syrian First Lady Asma al-Assad has portrayed herself as a defender of women and children's rights in her country. But she has been silent through much of the escalating violence, and has appeared publicly in support of her husband, Syrian President Bashar al-Assad. Call on Syria's First Lady to use her influence to defend the rights of women activists, and release those who are in detention. (http://www.amnestyusa.org/syriawomen)

Human Right № 1 - We Are All Born Free & Equal

Human Right № 1 - We Are All Born Free & Equal

Do you know what Human Rights are? Every person is entitled to certain fundamental rights - simply by the fact of being human. These are called “human rights” rather than a privilege (which can be taken away at someone’s whim). They are "rights" because they are things you are allowed to be, to do or to have. These rights are there for your protection against people who might want to harm or hurt you. They are also there to help us get along with each other and live in peace.